Listening to the Patients

Listening to their gut to improve the lives of people with type I diabetes.

"Listening to the patients" illustration

By Matthew Davidson

Listening to the Patients is developing sound-based meal detection system to improve artificial pancreases. Timing insulin delivery with a meal is an important part of controlling blood glucose levels and avoiding long-term complications. Accomplishing this high-risk goal will be a major step toward improving the lives of people with diabetes.

Many people with type I diabetes are treated with glucose monitors and insulin pumps delivering insulin in subcutaneous tissue. By combining a glucose monitor and an insulin pump one can make a devise delivering insulin based on the measured glucose levels. Such a devise is called an artificial pancreas. However, subcutaneous insulin delivery carries inherent delays in the effect on glucose levels making it hard to achieve good glucose control.

To reduce the delays associated with the subcutaneous approach, the Artificial Pancreas Trondheim (APT) research group work on intraperitoneal glucose monitoring and delivery, i.e. between the intestines. With this “double intraperitoneal” approach for an artificial pancreas the absorption of insulin and the effect on glucose levels are much faster.However, such an artificial pancreas will still struggle to handle increasing glucose levels after meals. It takes at least 30 minutes for the artificial pancreas to detect this rise after a meal, far too long a delay to control glucose properly. Over time, insufficient glucose control can lead to long-term issues like kidney disease, cardiovascular disease or even blindness.

Listening to the Patients’s bold new approach analyzes sounds in the gastrointestinal tract with external microphones for telltale sounds of a meal. The researchers will correlate this information with blood glucose levels to administer the correct dosage of insulin much closer to meal intake than current devices. In a recent pilot study, they were able to detect a meal in as little as 10 minutes after consumption.

This research has great potential for developing a vastly improved artificial pancreas, but it is also highly risky: their detection algorithm must be extremely accurate because administering a meal dose of insulin to a patient that has not eaten can be deadly. To ensure their algorithm meets this high standard, the Listening to the Patients team consists of engineering physicists, sound engineers, cyberneticists, physicians, and endocrinologists. They are using machine learning based on the principles of speech recognition and their knowledge of engineering and physiology to identify meal sounds and eliminate extraneous sounds. They expect to have a proof of concept listening device ready for testing within one year.

The Listening to the Patients team is working closely with people with diabetes to ensure a positive user experience. Privacy is a major concern with audio systems so their algorithm will identify and eliminate speech from the recordings. When fully developed, the system will analyze data real time and not store sound recordings.

Listening to the Patients project is part of the Artificial Pancreas Trondheim (APT) research group at The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. It is funded by the Research Council of Norway and is one of the multidisciplinary research projects within Centre for Digital Life Norway.

Prosjektinformasjon

  • Kategori:
    Helse
  • Varighet:
    4 years (2019–2022)
  • Støtte:
    Research Council of Norway
  • Institusjon:
    NTNU

Prosjektleder

Sven Magnus Carlsen

E-post: sven.carlsen@ntnu.no
Tlf: 91769528

Profil

Partnere

SINTEF Digital AS

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Deltakere

  • Sven Magnus Carlsen

    Sven Magnus Carlsen

    Professor in clinical research (NTNU) + Consultant in endocrinology, Dept. of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine (NTNU), Unit for Clinical Research (NTNU), Dept. of Endocrinology (St. Olavs Hospital)

    Head of the Artificial Pancreas Trondheim (APT) research group and the DLN projects "Double Intraperitoneal Artificial Pancreas" (DIAP) and "Listening to the patients". Supervisor for several PhD and master students in the medical part of APT.

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  • Reinold Ellingsen

    Reinold Ellingsen

    Senior Advisor, Dept. of Electronic Systems

    15 years experience in research and research management (SINTEF), founder of and 12 years as CEO of Invivosense AS/ASA, 4 years as general manager and board member of Invivosense Norway Ltd. Co-founder and board member of GlucoSet AS, a Trondheim based private company established in 2011 on the basis of a patented fiber optic intravascular glucose sensor, previously the Invivosense technology platform. Member of APT's steering group. Sharing responsibility with APT members on sensor technology and development, including IP. Co-supervisor of PhD and post.doc within optical sensor technology.

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  • Øyvind Stavdahl

    Øyvind Stavdahl

    Professor, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    Six years experience in contract research, innovation and research management from SINTEF, co-founder and former general manager of a startup company, co-founder and former head of the Human Motor Control (HMC) research network in Trondheim. Stavdahl has a solid record of participation in transdisciplinary research, mainly in the medical-technical area. Member of APT's steering group with main responsibility for modelling and control engineering activities.

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  • Anders Lyngvi Fougner

    Anders Lyngvi Fougner

    Associate Professor, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    MSc and PhD in Engineering Cybernetics, with specialization in medical cybernetics, myoelectric prosthesis control systems. Previously employed as a postdoc in Artificial Pancreas Trondheim during 2014–2017 with focus on modelling and system identification. Dr Fougner is also coordinator of the APT group. Supervisor for PhD candidates and postdocs within modeling, system identification, model predictive control and sound processing.

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  • Dag Roar Hjelme

    Dag Roar Hjelme

    Professor, Dept. of Electronic Systems

    He has more than 25 years of experience from research and development of optical fiber sensor technology. From 2000 to 2010 he was CTO in OptoMed AS and InvivoSense AS working on in vivo application of optical fiber sensor technology. He was supervisor for Sven Tierney and Nils Kristian Skjærvold during their PhDs on glucose sensor development and in vivo sensor testing. He is also a co-founder of GlucoSet AS. Supervisor for PhD students doing research on optical spectroscopy of peritoneal fluid.

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  • Elise Søiland

    Elise Søiland

    MSc student, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    Elise Søiland pursued a term project and her MSc thesis at Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics during Fall 2018 and Spring 2019, on topics related to system identification and meal detection. Supervised by Anders Lyngvi Fougner.

  • Sunilkumar Telagam Setti

    Sunilkumar Telagam Setti

    ERCIM postdoctoral research fellow, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    Dr Telagam Setti Sunilkumar is an ERCIM postdoctoral research fellow at the Department Engineering Cybernetics. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Indore. His research areas are digital signal processing and machine learning. He is employed as a postdoc in Artificial Pancreas Trondheim since February 2019. His focus is on meal detection based on sound recordings. Supervised by Anders Lyngvi Fougner and Øyvind Stavdahl.

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  • Nora Lyngstad Røste

    Nora Lyngstad Røste

    MSc student, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    Nora Lyngstad Røste pursued a term project at Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics during Fall 2019, on a topic related to early meal onset detection. Continues with a related MSc thesis during Spring 2020. Supervised by Anders Lyngvi Fougner and Sunilkumar Telagam Setti.

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  • Einar Henriksen

    Einar Henriksen

    MSc student, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    Einar Henriksen pursued a term project at Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics during Fall 2019, on a topic related to meal detection. Supervised by Anders Lyngvi Fougner and Sunilkumar Telagam Setti.

  • Andrea Holten

    Andrea Holten

    MSc student, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    Andrea Holten pursued a term project at Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics during Fall 2019, on a topic related to early meal onset detection. Continues with a related MSc thesis during Spring 2020. Supervised by Anders Lyngvi Fougner and Sunilkumar Telagam Setti.

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  • Pallavi Ajay Patil

    Pallavi Ajay Patil

    PhD candidate, Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    Pallavi Patil holds a M.Tech. degree in Biomedical Instrumentation from College of Engineering Pune, India. Her master thesis dealt with utilisation of an ultra-wideband sensor technology for X-ray Tube detection alignment. She is a PhD candidate at Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics since September 2019, where she studies early meal onset detection by analysis of body sounds and other sensor modalities. Supervised by Anders Lyngvi Fougner and Øyvind Stavdahl.

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  • Ingrid Anna Teigen

    Ingrid Anna Teigen

    PhD candidate, Dept. of Clinical and Molecular Medicine

    Ingrid Anna Teigen received her Cand.Med. degree from NTNU in 2015. She has worked as a specialty registrar in clinical pharmacology at Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, before starting as a PhD candidate for APT in December 2019. She is primarily focusing on early meal onset detection in patients with diabetes mellitus type I. Supervised by Sven Magnus Carlsen and Sverre Christiansen.

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